How to Keep on Keeping On

Fist

When I got laid off a year ago, I was not surprised, nor — for reasons I am not allowed to discuss — particularly upset.

The very next day (which was a Saturday), I revised my resume, started posting it on all the usual suspects and started hitting LinkedIn and other sites with a fury. I embarked on a mission to contact everyone I knew and made the obvious requests to keep their eyes and ears open.

I did not go into a funk; I did not feel sorry for myself; and I wasn’t even immediately worried about where my next paycheck was coming from.

I was doing everything I was supposed to do — or so I thought. But it was pointed out to me by two very good friends (who as is my way will remain nearly anonymous) that I was not doing what I do best:

Writing!

Both these friends — one who I have known since college and later worked with, the other who I have also known since almost the beginning of my career — basically kicked me in the butt and said: “Sit your tush down and write.”

They actually gave me a pretty hard time, because they said all I was doing, by not doing, was wasting my talent – and it is extensive, if I do say so myself.

At first, I was angry: Who are these people to tell me what to do? And then I thought about it and came to a conclusion:

They were right.

Now to the point: Just because you lose your job does not mean you should not continue to try and do what you know best.

Obviously in some professions it is easier than others: unless an unemployed actor is into street theater, this advice doesn’t help much.

But there are other ways to use your talents until you land where you want to:

Volunteering immediately comes to mind. So does reading everything you can on advancements in your profession and telling people – particularly on LinkedIn – what you have learned.

I have already blogged on the fear of writing and on retooling your career after 50, so I won’t repeat myself.

But I will say giving up is not the way to go.

There are days when you won’t feel like pushing; there are days when you will want to take off from the job-search grind – and you should, for both sanity and health reasons.

But we should still wake up most morning looking, driving ourselves and pushing forward. That’s how human beings are built.

And, in conclusion to one of my more obvious blogs:

I thank my old Mets fan friend from up north and the Cincinnati Kid for kicking me in the butt.

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